SEBE @ Deakin University, Studying Abroad

The Global adventures of our students and staff. Science, Engineering and the Built Environment are global disciplines and at Deakin University, Australia, we believe our students should have a global view to their study.
Kinabatangan River, Borneo
A couple of years back 14 Deakin Environmental science students and 3 staff visited Sabah in Borneo, on our international study tour. One of the highlights was getting into the Kinabatangan River area for four days of wildlife viewing. We spent most of our days on boats going up and down the river doing wildlife surveys.  It was amazing to see wild orangutan and hornbills, but you knew you were in relatively close proximity to oil palm plantations.  This amazing strip of lowland jungle isolated in a sea of oil palm is some of the most biodiverse habitat I have ever been in.  
A highlight, was working with local woman who spent their lives re-vegetating patches along the river that were deforested due to logging in the past. The work is back breaking in such a harsh climate, but their dedication was amazing.  In this climate you cant just plant a tree and walk away! You have to cut the grass and vines back for the next three years to let the plant have a chance of survival.  We hope some of the trees we planted have made it.
If you ever get the chance, a visit to the Kinabatangan river should be on your bucket list. Its future is uncertain, due to land-use conflict, but it is paradoxically a beacon of hope isolated in this transformed landscape.
Aperture
f/10
Shutter Speed
1/800th
ISO
400
Focal Length
471mm
Camera
Canon EOS 40D
Kinabatangan River, Borneo
A couple of years back 14 Deakin Environmental science students and 3 staff visited Sabah in Borneo, on our international study tour. One of the highlights was getting into the Kinabatangan River area for four days of wildlife viewing. We spent most of our days on boats going up and down the river doing wildlife surveys.  It was amazing to see wild orangutan and hornbills, but you knew you were in relatively close proximity to oil palm plantations.  This amazing strip of lowland jungle isolated in a sea of oil palm is some of the most biodiverse habitat I have ever been in.  
A highlight, was working with local woman who spent their lives re-vegetating patches along the river that were deforested due to logging in the past. The work is back breaking in such a harsh climate, but their dedication was amazing.  In this climate you cant just plant a tree and walk away! You have to cut the grass and vines back for the next three years to let the plant have a chance of survival.  We hope some of the trees we planted have made it.
If you ever get the chance, a visit to the Kinabatangan river should be on your bucket list. Its future is uncertain, due to land-use conflict, but it is paradoxically a beacon of hope isolated in this transformed landscape.
Aperture
f/9
Shutter Speed
1/640th
ISO
400
Focal Length
471mm
Camera
Canon EOS 40D
Kinabatangan River, Borneo
A couple of years back 14 Deakin Environmental science students and 3 staff visited Sabah in Borneo, on our international study tour. One of the highlights was getting into the Kinabatangan River area for four days of wildlife viewing. We spent most of our days on boats going up and down the river doing wildlife surveys.  It was amazing to see wild orangutan and hornbills, but you knew you were in relatively close proximity to oil palm plantations.  This amazing strip of lowland jungle isolated in a sea of oil palm is some of the most biodiverse habitat I have ever been in.  
A highlight, was working with local woman who spent their lives re-vegetating patches along the river that were deforested due to logging in the past. The work is back breaking in such a harsh climate, but their dedication was amazing.  In this climate you cant just plant a tree and walk away! You have to cut the grass and vines back for the next three years to let the plant have a chance of survival.  We hope some of the trees we planted have made it.
If you ever get the chance, a visit to the Kinabatangan river should be on your bucket list. Its future is uncertain, due to land-use conflict, but it is paradoxically a beacon of hope isolated in this transformed landscape.
Kinabatangan River, Borneo
A couple of years back 14 Deakin Environmental science students and 3 staff visited Sabah in Borneo, on our international study tour. One of the highlights was getting into the Kinabatangan River area for four days of wildlife viewing. We spent most of our days on boats going up and down the river doing wildlife surveys.  It was amazing to see wild orangutan and hornbills, but you knew you were in relatively close proximity to oil palm plantations.  This amazing strip of lowland jungle isolated in a sea of oil palm is some of the most biodiverse habitat I have ever been in.  
A highlight, was working with local woman who spent their lives re-vegetating patches along the river that were deforested due to logging in the past. The work is back breaking in such a harsh climate, but their dedication was amazing.  In this climate you cant just plant a tree and walk away! You have to cut the grass and vines back for the next three years to let the plant have a chance of survival.  We hope some of the trees we planted have made it.
If you ever get the chance, a visit to the Kinabatangan river should be on your bucket list. Its future is uncertain, due to land-use conflict, but it is paradoxically a beacon of hope isolated in this transformed landscape.
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
800
Focal Length
471mm
Camera
Canon EOS 40D
Kinabatangan River, Borneo
A couple of years back 14 Deakin Environmental science students and 3 staff visited Sabah in Borneo, on our international study tour. One of the highlights was getting into the Kinabatangan River area for four days of wildlife viewing. We spent most of our days on boats going up and down the river doing wildlife surveys.  It was amazing to see wild orangutan and hornbills, but you knew you were in relatively close proximity to oil palm plantations.  This amazing strip of lowland jungle isolated in a sea of oil palm is some of the most biodiverse habitat I have ever been in.  
A highlight, was working with local woman who spent their lives re-vegetating patches along the river that were deforested due to logging in the past. The work is back breaking in such a harsh climate, but their dedication was amazing.  In this climate you cant just plant a tree and walk away! You have to cut the grass and vines back for the next three years to let the plant have a chance of survival.  We hope some of the trees we planted have made it.
If you ever get the chance, a visit to the Kinabatangan river should be on your bucket list. Its future is uncertain, due to land-use conflict, but it is paradoxically a beacon of hope isolated in this transformed landscape.
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/3th
ISO
800
Focal Length
471mm
Camera
Canon EOS 40D
Kinabatangan River, Borneo
A couple of years back 14 Deakin Environmental science students and 3 staff visited Sabah in Borneo, on our international study tour. One of the highlights was getting into the Kinabatangan River area for four days of wildlife viewing. We spent most of our days on boats going up and down the river doing wildlife surveys.  It was amazing to see wild orangutan and hornbills, but you knew you were in relatively close proximity to oil palm plantations.  This amazing strip of lowland jungle isolated in a sea of oil palm is some of the most biodiverse habitat I have ever been in.  
A highlight, was working with local woman who spent their lives re-vegetating patches along the river that were deforested due to logging in the past. The work is back breaking in such a harsh climate, but their dedication was amazing.  In this climate you cant just plant a tree and walk away! You have to cut the grass and vines back for the next three years to let the plant have a chance of survival.  We hope some of the trees we planted have made it.
If you ever get the chance, a visit to the Kinabatangan river should be on your bucket list. Its future is uncertain, due to land-use conflict, but it is paradoxically a beacon of hope isolated in this transformed landscape.
Aperture
f/11
Shutter Speed
1/1000th
ISO
400
Focal Length
471mm
Camera
Canon EOS 40D
Kinabatangan River, Borneo
A couple of years back 14 Deakin Environmental science students and 3 staff visited Sabah in Borneo, on our international study tour. One of the highlights was getting into the Kinabatangan River area for four days of wildlife viewing. We spent most of our days on boats going up and down the river doing wildlife surveys.  It was amazing to see wild orangutan and hornbills, but you knew you were in relatively close proximity to oil palm plantations.  This amazing strip of lowland jungle isolated in a sea of oil palm is some of the most biodiverse habitat I have ever been in.  
A highlight, was working with local woman who spent their lives re-vegetating patches along the river that were deforested due to logging in the past. The work is back breaking in such a harsh climate, but their dedication was amazing.  In this climate you cant just plant a tree and walk away! You have to cut the grass and vines back for the next three years to let the plant have a chance of survival.  We hope some of the trees we planted have made it.
If you ever get the chance, a visit to the Kinabatangan river should be on your bucket list. Its future is uncertain, due to land-use conflict, but it is paradoxically a beacon of hope isolated in this transformed landscape.
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/30th
ISO
800
Focal Length
330mm
Camera
Canon EOS 40D
Kinabatangan River, Borneo
A couple of years back 14 Deakin Environmental science students and 3 staff visited Sabah in Borneo, on our international study tour. One of the highlights was getting into the Kinabatangan River area for four days of wildlife viewing. We spent most of our days on boats going up and down the river doing wildlife surveys.  It was amazing to see wild orangutan and hornbills, but you knew you were in relatively close proximity to oil palm plantations.  This amazing strip of lowland jungle isolated in a sea of oil palm is some of the most biodiverse habitat I have ever been in.  
A highlight, was working with local woman who spent their lives re-vegetating patches along the river that were deforested due to logging in the past. The work is back breaking in such a harsh climate, but their dedication was amazing.  In this climate you cant just plant a tree and walk away! You have to cut the grass and vines back for the next three years to let the plant have a chance of survival.  We hope some of the trees we planted have made it.
If you ever get the chance, a visit to the Kinabatangan river should be on your bucket list. Its future is uncertain, due to land-use conflict, but it is paradoxically a beacon of hope isolated in this transformed landscape.
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/125th
ISO
800
Focal Length
471mm
Camera
Canon EOS 40D
Kinabatangan River, Borneo
A couple of years back 14 Deakin Environmental science students and 3 staff visited Sabah in Borneo, on our international study tour. One of the highlights was getting into the Kinabatangan River area for four days of wildlife viewing. We spent most of our days on boats going up and down the river doing wildlife surveys.  It was amazing to see wild orangutan and hornbills, but you knew you were in relatively close proximity to oil palm plantations.  This amazing strip of lowland jungle isolated in a sea of oil palm is some of the most biodiverse habitat I have ever been in.  
A highlight, was working with local woman who spent their lives re-vegetating patches along the river that were deforested due to logging in the past. The work is back breaking in such a harsh climate, but their dedication was amazing.  In this climate you cant just plant a tree and walk away! You have to cut the grass and vines back for the next three years to let the plant have a chance of survival.  We hope some of the trees we planted have made it.
If you ever get the chance, a visit to the Kinabatangan river should be on your bucket list. Its future is uncertain, due to land-use conflict, but it is paradoxically a beacon of hope isolated in this transformed landscape.
Kinabatangan River, Borneo
A couple of years back 14 Deakin Environmental science students and 3 staff visited Sabah in Borneo, on our international study tour. One of the highlights was getting into the Kinabatangan River area for four days of wildlife viewing. We spent most of our days on boats going up and down the river doing wildlife surveys.  It was amazing to see wild orangutan and hornbills, but you knew you were in relatively close proximity to oil palm plantations.  This amazing strip of lowland jungle isolated in a sea of oil palm is some of the most biodiverse habitat I have ever been in.  
A highlight, was working with local woman who spent their lives re-vegetating patches along the river that were deforested due to logging in the past. The work is back breaking in such a harsh climate, but their dedication was amazing.  In this climate you cant just plant a tree and walk away! You have to cut the grass and vines back for the next three years to let the plant have a chance of survival.  We hope some of the trees we planted have made it.
If you ever get the chance, a visit to the Kinabatangan river should be on your bucket list. Its future is uncertain, due to land-use conflict, but it is paradoxically a beacon of hope isolated in this transformed landscape.

Kinabatangan River, Borneo

A couple of years back 14 Deakin Environmental science students and 3 staff visited Sabah in Borneo, on our international study tour. One of the highlights was getting into the Kinabatangan River area for four days of wildlife viewing. We spent most of our days on boats going up and down the river doing wildlife surveys.  It was amazing to see wild orangutan and hornbills, but you knew you were in relatively close proximity to oil palm plantations.  This amazing strip of lowland jungle isolated in a sea of oil palm is some of the most biodiverse habitat I have ever been in.  

A highlight, was working with local woman who spent their lives re-vegetating patches along the river that were deforested due to logging in the past. The work is back breaking in such a harsh climate, but their dedication was amazing.  In this climate you cant just plant a tree and walk away! You have to cut the grass and vines back for the next three years to let the plant have a chance of survival.  We hope some of the trees we planted have made it.

If you ever get the chance, a visit to the Kinabatangan river should be on your bucket list. Its future is uncertain, due to land-use conflict, but it is paradoxically a beacon of hope isolated in this transformed landscape.

(Source: deakin-environment)

Deakin Enviro students getting awesome global conservation experience!
An elective option for all Deakin enviro students is SLE225 Global Environmental Placement. In this unit students choose an international location to undertake environmental based volunteer work. Countries that students have volunteered in include South Africa, Costa Rica, Indonesia, Borneo, Maldives, Fiji, Cambodia and Thailand just to name a few! We have over 150 students heading overseas this summer to undertake volunteer work as part of this unit so stay tuned for lots more stories!
Aperture
f/2.8
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
100
Focal Length
4mm
Camera
Panasonic DMC-FZ28
Deakin Enviro students getting awesome global conservation experience!
An elective option for all Deakin enviro students is SLE225 Global Environmental Placement. In this unit students choose an international location to undertake environmental based volunteer work. Countries that students have volunteered in include South Africa, Costa Rica, Indonesia, Borneo, Maldives, Fiji, Cambodia and Thailand just to name a few! We have over 150 students heading overseas this summer to undertake volunteer work as part of this unit so stay tuned for lots more stories!
Aperture
f/5
Shutter Speed
1/320th
ISO
100
Focal Length
4mm
Camera
Panasonic DMC-FZ28
Deakin Enviro students getting awesome global conservation experience!
An elective option for all Deakin enviro students is SLE225 Global Environmental Placement. In this unit students choose an international location to undertake environmental based volunteer work. Countries that students have volunteered in include South Africa, Costa Rica, Indonesia, Borneo, Maldives, Fiji, Cambodia and Thailand just to name a few! We have over 150 students heading overseas this summer to undertake volunteer work as part of this unit so stay tuned for lots more stories!
Deakin Enviro students getting awesome global conservation experience!
An elective option for all Deakin enviro students is SLE225 Global Environmental Placement. In this unit students choose an international location to undertake environmental based volunteer work. Countries that students have volunteered in include South Africa, Costa Rica, Indonesia, Borneo, Maldives, Fiji, Cambodia and Thailand just to name a few! We have over 150 students heading overseas this summer to undertake volunteer work as part of this unit so stay tuned for lots more stories!
Aperture
f/2.4
Shutter Speed
1/186th
ISO
50
Focal Length
4mm
Camera
iPhone 5c
Deakin Enviro students getting awesome global conservation experience!
An elective option for all Deakin enviro students is SLE225 Global Environmental Placement. In this unit students choose an international location to undertake environmental based volunteer work. Countries that students have volunteered in include South Africa, Costa Rica, Indonesia, Borneo, Maldives, Fiji, Cambodia and Thailand just to name a few! We have over 150 students heading overseas this summer to undertake volunteer work as part of this unit so stay tuned for lots more stories!
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/60th
ISO
3200
Focal Length
55mm
Camera
Nikon D5100
Deakin Enviro students getting awesome global conservation experience!
An elective option for all Deakin enviro students is SLE225 Global Environmental Placement. In this unit students choose an international location to undertake environmental based volunteer work. Countries that students have volunteered in include South Africa, Costa Rica, Indonesia, Borneo, Maldives, Fiji, Cambodia and Thailand just to name a few! We have over 150 students heading overseas this summer to undertake volunteer work as part of this unit so stay tuned for lots more stories!
Deakin Enviro students getting awesome global conservation experience!
An elective option for all Deakin enviro students is SLE225 Global Environmental Placement. In this unit students choose an international location to undertake environmental based volunteer work. Countries that students have volunteered in include South Africa, Costa Rica, Indonesia, Borneo, Maldives, Fiji, Cambodia and Thailand just to name a few! We have over 150 students heading overseas this summer to undertake volunteer work as part of this unit so stay tuned for lots more stories!
Deakin Enviro students getting awesome global conservation experience!
An elective option for all Deakin enviro students is SLE225 Global Environmental Placement. In this unit students choose an international location to undertake environmental based volunteer work. Countries that students have volunteered in include South Africa, Costa Rica, Indonesia, Borneo, Maldives, Fiji, Cambodia and Thailand just to name a few! We have over 150 students heading overseas this summer to undertake volunteer work as part of this unit so stay tuned for lots more stories!
Aperture
f/3.5
Shutter Speed
1/320th
ISO
100
Focal Length
6mm
Camera
Olympus TG-2
Deakin Enviro students getting awesome global conservation experience!
An elective option for all Deakin enviro students is SLE225 Global Environmental Placement. In this unit students choose an international location to undertake environmental based volunteer work. Countries that students have volunteered in include South Africa, Costa Rica, Indonesia, Borneo, Maldives, Fiji, Cambodia and Thailand just to name a few! We have over 150 students heading overseas this summer to undertake volunteer work as part of this unit so stay tuned for lots more stories!
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/500th
ISO
200
Focal Length
145mm
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
Deakin Enviro students getting awesome global conservation experience!
An elective option for all Deakin enviro students is SLE225 Global Environmental Placement. In this unit students choose an international location to undertake environmental based volunteer work. Countries that students have volunteered in include South Africa, Costa Rica, Indonesia, Borneo, Maldives, Fiji, Cambodia and Thailand just to name a few! We have over 150 students heading overseas this summer to undertake volunteer work as part of this unit so stay tuned for lots more stories!
Aperture
f/6.3
Shutter Speed
1/125th
ISO
400
Focal Length
28mm
Camera
Nikon D300s

Deakin Enviro students getting awesome global conservation experience!

An elective option for all Deakin enviro students is SLE225 Global Environmental Placement. In this unit students choose an international location to undertake environmental based volunteer work. Countries that students have volunteered in include South Africa, Costa Rica, Indonesia, Borneo, Maldives, Fiji, Cambodia and Thailand just to name a few! We have over 150 students heading overseas this summer to undertake volunteer work as part of this unit so stay tuned for lots more stories!

(Source: deakin-environment)

A Global perspective is critical in modern conservation
Having a World view and an understanding of the roles of culture and economics etc is critical for modern conservation biology students. That is why we focus so much on getting Deakin University Environmental Science students to spend some of their time studying overseas. One of the amazing opportunities we offer our students is a study tour to Borneo (SLE353) where students are immersed in the amazing culture and ecosystems that Borneo has to offer.  It is not only a life changing experience, but our students grow and develop, and learn to have a deeper understanding of the drivers behind conservation.
We are getting ready to head to Borneo again in November, and for the 16 environmental students going, this will be a trip of a life time. We cant wait to get back to our great Bornean friends again, and of course make new ones.
Here are a few images from our tour last year. Hope you find them inspiring!
Aperture
f/6.3
Shutter Speed
1/160th
ISO
400
Focal Length
300mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
A Global perspective is critical in modern conservation
Having a World view and an understanding of the roles of culture and economics etc is critical for modern conservation biology students. That is why we focus so much on getting Deakin University Environmental Science students to spend some of their time studying overseas. One of the amazing opportunities we offer our students is a study tour to Borneo (SLE353) where students are immersed in the amazing culture and ecosystems that Borneo has to offer.  It is not only a life changing experience, but our students grow and develop, and learn to have a deeper understanding of the drivers behind conservation.
We are getting ready to head to Borneo again in November, and for the 16 environmental students going, this will be a trip of a life time. We cant wait to get back to our great Bornean friends again, and of course make new ones.
Here are a few images from our tour last year. Hope you find them inspiring!
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/60th
ISO
400
Focal Length
300mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
A Global perspective is critical in modern conservation
Having a World view and an understanding of the roles of culture and economics etc is critical for modern conservation biology students. That is why we focus so much on getting Deakin University Environmental Science students to spend some of their time studying overseas. One of the amazing opportunities we offer our students is a study tour to Borneo (SLE353) where students are immersed in the amazing culture and ecosystems that Borneo has to offer.  It is not only a life changing experience, but our students grow and develop, and learn to have a deeper understanding of the drivers behind conservation.
We are getting ready to head to Borneo again in November, and for the 16 environmental students going, this will be a trip of a life time. We cant wait to get back to our great Bornean friends again, and of course make new ones.
Here are a few images from our tour last year. Hope you find them inspiring!
Aperture
f/6.3
Shutter Speed
1/160th
ISO
400
Focal Length
150mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
A Global perspective is critical in modern conservation
Having a World view and an understanding of the roles of culture and economics etc is critical for modern conservation biology students. That is why we focus so much on getting Deakin University Environmental Science students to spend some of their time studying overseas. One of the amazing opportunities we offer our students is a study tour to Borneo (SLE353) where students are immersed in the amazing culture and ecosystems that Borneo has to offer.  It is not only a life changing experience, but our students grow and develop, and learn to have a deeper understanding of the drivers behind conservation.
We are getting ready to head to Borneo again in November, and for the 16 environmental students going, this will be a trip of a life time. We cant wait to get back to our great Bornean friends again, and of course make new ones.
Here are a few images from our tour last year. Hope you find them inspiring!
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/60th
ISO
400
Focal Length
300mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
A Global perspective is critical in modern conservation
Having a World view and an understanding of the roles of culture and economics etc is critical for modern conservation biology students. That is why we focus so much on getting Deakin University Environmental Science students to spend some of their time studying overseas. One of the amazing opportunities we offer our students is a study tour to Borneo (SLE353) where students are immersed in the amazing culture and ecosystems that Borneo has to offer.  It is not only a life changing experience, but our students grow and develop, and learn to have a deeper understanding of the drivers behind conservation.
We are getting ready to head to Borneo again in November, and for the 16 environmental students going, this will be a trip of a life time. We cant wait to get back to our great Bornean friends again, and of course make new ones.
Here are a few images from our tour last year. Hope you find them inspiring!
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/125th
ISO
400
Focal Length
300mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
A Global perspective is critical in modern conservation
Having a World view and an understanding of the roles of culture and economics etc is critical for modern conservation biology students. That is why we focus so much on getting Deakin University Environmental Science students to spend some of their time studying overseas. One of the amazing opportunities we offer our students is a study tour to Borneo (SLE353) where students are immersed in the amazing culture and ecosystems that Borneo has to offer.  It is not only a life changing experience, but our students grow and develop, and learn to have a deeper understanding of the drivers behind conservation.
We are getting ready to head to Borneo again in November, and for the 16 environmental students going, this will be a trip of a life time. We cant wait to get back to our great Bornean friends again, and of course make new ones.
Here are a few images from our tour last year. Hope you find them inspiring!
Aperture
f/7.1
Shutter Speed
1/200th
ISO
400
Focal Length
135mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
A Global perspective is critical in modern conservation
Having a World view and an understanding of the roles of culture and economics etc is critical for modern conservation biology students. That is why we focus so much on getting Deakin University Environmental Science students to spend some of their time studying overseas. One of the amazing opportunities we offer our students is a study tour to Borneo (SLE353) where students are immersed in the amazing culture and ecosystems that Borneo has to offer.  It is not only a life changing experience, but our students grow and develop, and learn to have a deeper understanding of the drivers behind conservation.
We are getting ready to head to Borneo again in November, and for the 16 environmental students going, this will be a trip of a life time. We cant wait to get back to our great Bornean friends again, and of course make new ones.
Here are a few images from our tour last year. Hope you find them inspiring!
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
5000
Focal Length
300mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
A Global perspective is critical in modern conservation
Having a World view and an understanding of the roles of culture and economics etc is critical for modern conservation biology students. That is why we focus so much on getting Deakin University Environmental Science students to spend some of their time studying overseas. One of the amazing opportunities we offer our students is a study tour to Borneo (SLE353) where students are immersed in the amazing culture and ecosystems that Borneo has to offer.  It is not only a life changing experience, but our students grow and develop, and learn to have a deeper understanding of the drivers behind conservation.
We are getting ready to head to Borneo again in November, and for the 16 environmental students going, this will be a trip of a life time. We cant wait to get back to our great Bornean friends again, and of course make new ones.
Here are a few images from our tour last year. Hope you find them inspiring!
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/125th
ISO
400
Focal Length
285mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D
A Global perspective is critical in modern conservation
Having a World view and an understanding of the roles of culture and economics etc is critical for modern conservation biology students. That is why we focus so much on getting Deakin University Environmental Science students to spend some of their time studying overseas. One of the amazing opportunities we offer our students is a study tour to Borneo (SLE353) where students are immersed in the amazing culture and ecosystems that Borneo has to offer.  It is not only a life changing experience, but our students grow and develop, and learn to have a deeper understanding of the drivers behind conservation.
We are getting ready to head to Borneo again in November, and for the 16 environmental students going, this will be a trip of a life time. We cant wait to get back to our great Bornean friends again, and of course make new ones.
Here are a few images from our tour last year. Hope you find them inspiring!
Aperture
f/9
Shutter Speed
1/200th
ISO
400
Focal Length
35mm
Camera
Canon EOS 6D

A Global perspective is critical in modern conservation

Having a World view and an understanding of the roles of culture and economics etc is critical for modern conservation biology students. That is why we focus so much on getting Deakin University Environmental Science students to spend some of their time studying overseas. One of the amazing opportunities we offer our students is a study tour to Borneo (SLE353) where students are immersed in the amazing culture and ecosystems that Borneo has to offer.  It is not only a life changing experience, but our students grow and develop, and learn to have a deeper understanding of the drivers behind conservation.

We are getting ready to head to Borneo again in November, and for the 16 environmental students going, this will be a trip of a life time. We cant wait to get back to our great Bornean friends again, and of course make new ones.

Here are a few images from our tour last year. Hope you find them inspiring!

(Source: deakin-environment)

Unique wildlife conservation expedition in Tortuguero National  Park Costa Rica
Want to live in a coconut plantation, in a jungle, with the Caribbean beach as your front yard, while working with Jaguars and turtles or sloths? Then why not try GVI?!
I’ve just completed a one month paid voluntary program with Global Vision International (GVI) in Costa Rica as part of my Global Environmental Placement, on their unique wildlife conservation expedition based in Tortuguero national park. This was an unparalleled opportunity to experience and understand one of the most remote and breathtaking regions and ecosystems of the rainforest and Caribbean beaches
At GVI, I helped collect important research data on jaguars, marine sea turtles, aquatic birds and other biodiversity surveys; my favorite part was exploring jungle trails and seeking out sloths, tapirs and tamanduas while I worked! I highly valued being able to develop my scientific knowledge and skills and the efficient training. Let GVI help you flourish in your professional development, too! I didn’t need any experience or qualifications – they’ll train you starting from first aid to practical skills (all fees included)!
And GVI offers a far better environment to learn and grow – forget offices! Yuck! – I was working on beaches and in jungles.
What a way to make a difference!
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/60th
ISO
3200
Focal Length
55mm
Camera
Nikon D5100
Unique wildlife conservation expedition in Tortuguero National  Park Costa Rica
Want to live in a coconut plantation, in a jungle, with the Caribbean beach as your front yard, while working with Jaguars and turtles or sloths? Then why not try GVI?!
I’ve just completed a one month paid voluntary program with Global Vision International (GVI) in Costa Rica as part of my Global Environmental Placement, on their unique wildlife conservation expedition based in Tortuguero national park. This was an unparalleled opportunity to experience and understand one of the most remote and breathtaking regions and ecosystems of the rainforest and Caribbean beaches
At GVI, I helped collect important research data on jaguars, marine sea turtles, aquatic birds and other biodiversity surveys; my favorite part was exploring jungle trails and seeking out sloths, tapirs and tamanduas while I worked! I highly valued being able to develop my scientific knowledge and skills and the efficient training. Let GVI help you flourish in your professional development, too! I didn’t need any experience or qualifications – they’ll train you starting from first aid to practical skills (all fees included)!
And GVI offers a far better environment to learn and grow – forget offices! Yuck! – I was working on beaches and in jungles.
What a way to make a difference!
Aperture
f/10
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
320
Focal Length
18mm
Camera
Nikon D5100

Unique wildlife conservation expedition in Tortuguero National Park Costa Rica

Want to live in a coconut plantation, in a jungle, with the Caribbean beach as your front yard, while working with Jaguars and turtles or sloths? Then why not try GVI?!

I’ve just completed a one month paid voluntary program with Global Vision International (GVI) in Costa Rica as part of my Global Environmental Placement, on their unique wildlife conservation expedition based in Tortuguero national park. This was an unparalleled opportunity to experience and understand one of the most remote and breathtaking regions and ecosystems of the rainforest and Caribbean beaches

At GVI, I helped collect important research data on jaguars, marine sea turtles, aquatic birds and other biodiversity surveys; my favorite part was exploring jungle trails and seeking out sloths, tapirs and tamanduas while I worked! I highly valued being able to develop my scientific knowledge and skills and the efficient training. Let GVI help you flourish in your professional development, too! I didn’t need any experience or qualifications they’ll train you starting from first aid to practical skills (all fees included)!

And GVI offers a far better environment to learn and grow forget offices! Yuck! I was working on beaches and in jungles.

What a way to make a difference!

(Source: deakin-environment)

Working with Spinner Dolphins in Fiji
Bula (hello) everyone!
My name is Paige and I am a Marine Biology student at Deakin University. I completed my Global Environmental Placement through experiencing an amazing two weeks in Fiji with Global Vision International (GVI); collecting data on the Spinner dolphin population of Moon Reef for the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society. I worked closely with dolphins’ everyday with the aim of developing the already protected Moon Reef into a dolphin sanctuary! Each day consisted of a fun boat trip out to the reef to study the dolphins’ acoustics and behaviour, along with some photo identification of individual dolphins. I even got to name one that had a unique dorsal fin! Besides the fantastic research itself, I learnt so much about the local culture, language and of course the dolphins! I also made new friends from all over the world (both local to Fiji and international), made some useful professional connections and was accepted into the local village as a friend. If you get the opportunity to do this elective or this trip with GVI, do not miss it! It has definitely been a highlight of my course and my life!

Vinaka (thank you) everyone!
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/500th
ISO
200
Focal Length
145mm
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
Working with Spinner Dolphins in Fiji
Bula (hello) everyone!
My name is Paige and I am a Marine Biology student at Deakin University. I completed my Global Environmental Placement through experiencing an amazing two weeks in Fiji with Global Vision International (GVI); collecting data on the Spinner dolphin population of Moon Reef for the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society. I worked closely with dolphins’ everyday with the aim of developing the already protected Moon Reef into a dolphin sanctuary! Each day consisted of a fun boat trip out to the reef to study the dolphins’ acoustics and behaviour, along with some photo identification of individual dolphins. I even got to name one that had a unique dorsal fin! Besides the fantastic research itself, I learnt so much about the local culture, language and of course the dolphins! I also made new friends from all over the world (both local to Fiji and international), made some useful professional connections and was accepted into the local village as a friend. If you get the opportunity to do this elective or this trip with GVI, do not miss it! It has definitely been a highlight of my course and my life!

Vinaka (thank you) everyone!
Working with Spinner Dolphins in Fiji
Bula (hello) everyone!
My name is Paige and I am a Marine Biology student at Deakin University. I completed my Global Environmental Placement through experiencing an amazing two weeks in Fiji with Global Vision International (GVI); collecting data on the Spinner dolphin population of Moon Reef for the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society. I worked closely with dolphins’ everyday with the aim of developing the already protected Moon Reef into a dolphin sanctuary! Each day consisted of a fun boat trip out to the reef to study the dolphins’ acoustics and behaviour, along with some photo identification of individual dolphins. I even got to name one that had a unique dorsal fin! Besides the fantastic research itself, I learnt so much about the local culture, language and of course the dolphins! I also made new friends from all over the world (both local to Fiji and international), made some useful professional connections and was accepted into the local village as a friend. If you get the opportunity to do this elective or this trip with GVI, do not miss it! It has definitely been a highlight of my course and my life!

Vinaka (thank you) everyone!
Aperture
f/2.8
Shutter Speed
1/339th
ISO
100
Focal Length
2mm
Camera
GoPro HERO3+ Black Edition

Working with Spinner Dolphins in Fiji

Bula (hello) everyone!

My name is Paige and I am a Marine Biology student at Deakin University. I completed my Global Environmental Placement through experiencing an amazing two weeks in Fiji with Global Vision International (GVI); collecting data on the Spinner dolphin population of Moon Reef for the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society. I worked closely with dolphins’ everyday with the aim of developing the already protected Moon Reef into a dolphin sanctuary! Each day consisted of a fun boat trip out to the reef to study the dolphinsacoustics and behaviour, along with some photo identification of individual dolphins. I even got to name one that had a unique dorsal fin! Besides the fantastic research itself, I learnt so much about the local culture, language and of course the dolphins! I also made new friends from all over the world (both local to Fiji and international), made some useful professional connections and was accepted into the local village as a friend. If you get the opportunity to do this elective or this trip with GVI, do not miss it! It has definitely been a highlight of my course and my life!

Vinaka (thank you) everyone!

(Source: deakin-environment)

Working with the great white sharks in South Africa
Hi my name is Lisa and I have just completed an internship with White Shark Africa in Mossel Bay, South Africa as my Global Environmental Placement at Deakin University.

The White Shark Africa is a shark cage diving company which also hold a shark warriors internship program. During my stay in Mossel Bay I had the opportunity to be involved in shark tagging which enabled me to gain my skills in shark handling as well as learning about the importance of shark research. I also had the opportunity to help with the ecotourism side of the company, taking tourists out on the cage diving boat and educate them on the Great White shark.

The best experience I had whilst at the White Shark Africa program was free diving with blue sharks. This enabled us to get really close with the sharks who would swim right up to us and check us out!

I will never forget the amazing experience I had at White Shark Africa and would strongly recommend it to anybody wanting to gain skills in shark research and help with shark conservation
Working with the great white sharks in South Africa
Hi my name is Lisa and I have just completed an internship with White Shark Africa in Mossel Bay, South Africa as my Global Environmental Placement at Deakin University.

The White Shark Africa is a shark cage diving company which also hold a shark warriors internship program. During my stay in Mossel Bay I had the opportunity to be involved in shark tagging which enabled me to gain my skills in shark handling as well as learning about the importance of shark research. I also had the opportunity to help with the ecotourism side of the company, taking tourists out on the cage diving boat and educate them on the Great White shark.

The best experience I had whilst at the White Shark Africa program was free diving with blue sharks. This enabled us to get really close with the sharks who would swim right up to us and check us out!

I will never forget the amazing experience I had at White Shark Africa and would strongly recommend it to anybody wanting to gain skills in shark research and help with shark conservation
Working with the great white sharks in South Africa
Hi my name is Lisa and I have just completed an internship with White Shark Africa in Mossel Bay, South Africa as my Global Environmental Placement at Deakin University.

The White Shark Africa is a shark cage diving company which also hold a shark warriors internship program. During my stay in Mossel Bay I had the opportunity to be involved in shark tagging which enabled me to gain my skills in shark handling as well as learning about the importance of shark research. I also had the opportunity to help with the ecotourism side of the company, taking tourists out on the cage diving boat and educate them on the Great White shark.

The best experience I had whilst at the White Shark Africa program was free diving with blue sharks. This enabled us to get really close with the sharks who would swim right up to us and check us out!

I will never forget the amazing experience I had at White Shark Africa and would strongly recommend it to anybody wanting to gain skills in shark research and help with shark conservation
Working with the great white sharks in South Africa

Hi my name is Lisa and I have just completed an internship with White Shark Africa in Mossel Bay, South Africa as my Global Environmental Placement at Deakin University.

The White Shark Africa is a shark cage diving company which also hold a shark warriors internship program. During my stay in Mossel Bay I had the opportunity to be involved in shark tagging which enabled me to gain my skills in shark handling as well as learning about the importance of shark research. I also had the opportunity to help with the ecotourism side of the company, taking tourists out on the cage diving boat and educate them on the Great White shark.

The best experience I had whilst at the White Shark Africa program was free diving with blue sharks. This enabled us to get really close with the sharks who would swim right up to us and check us out!

I will never forget the amazing experience I had at White Shark Africa and would strongly recommend it to anybody wanting to gain skills in shark research and help with shark conservation

(Source: deakin-environment)

Working in a Thai Elephant Home as part of my studies!
My name is Bec, and I am currently a student at Deakin University studying wildlife and conservation biology. I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to go over to Chiangmai in Thailand and spend 10 days at the Thai Elephant Home as part of my Global Environmental Placement. Surrounded by beautiful misty mountains, we fed the elephants, cleaned up after them, trekked with them through the surrounding jungle and gave them a good scrub in the black mud ‘spa’. Contributing to the functioning of the Thai Elephant Home was just as rewarding, working as a team to make fire breaks around the property and going out in to the fields to cut grass and corn to feed the elephants. The work didn’t seem so hard when almost every day we got to go swimming with the elephants in the river, watching them splash around and being able to give them a good wash and you could see how much they loved it. The elephants were cared for and the people were so friendly you really did feel like you were part of their family. Spending so much time up close and personal with these magnificent creatures and being immersed in authentic Thai culture was truly amazing and I can’t recommend it highly enough!
Working in a Thai Elephant Home as part of my studies!
My name is Bec, and I am currently a student at Deakin University studying wildlife and conservation biology. I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to go over to Chiangmai in Thailand and spend 10 days at the Thai Elephant Home as part of my Global Environmental Placement. Surrounded by beautiful misty mountains, we fed the elephants, cleaned up after them, trekked with them through the surrounding jungle and gave them a good scrub in the black mud ‘spa’. Contributing to the functioning of the Thai Elephant Home was just as rewarding, working as a team to make fire breaks around the property and going out in to the fields to cut grass and corn to feed the elephants. The work didn’t seem so hard when almost every day we got to go swimming with the elephants in the river, watching them splash around and being able to give them a good wash and you could see how much they loved it. The elephants were cared for and the people were so friendly you really did feel like you were part of their family. Spending so much time up close and personal with these magnificent creatures and being immersed in authentic Thai culture was truly amazing and I can’t recommend it highly enough!
Working in a Thai Elephant Home as part of my studies!
My name is Bec, and I am currently a student at Deakin University studying wildlife and conservation biology. I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to go over to Chiangmai in Thailand and spend 10 days at the Thai Elephant Home as part of my Global Environmental Placement. Surrounded by beautiful misty mountains, we fed the elephants, cleaned up after them, trekked with them through the surrounding jungle and gave them a good scrub in the black mud ‘spa’. Contributing to the functioning of the Thai Elephant Home was just as rewarding, working as a team to make fire breaks around the property and going out in to the fields to cut grass and corn to feed the elephants. The work didn’t seem so hard when almost every day we got to go swimming with the elephants in the river, watching them splash around and being able to give them a good wash and you could see how much they loved it. The elephants were cared for and the people were so friendly you really did feel like you were part of their family. Spending so much time up close and personal with these magnificent creatures and being immersed in authentic Thai culture was truly amazing and I can’t recommend it highly enough!

Working in a Thai Elephant Home as part of my studies!

My name is Bec, and I am currently a student at Deakin University studying wildlife and conservation biology. I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to go over to Chiangmai in Thailand and spend 10 days at the Thai Elephant Home as part of my Global Environmental Placement. Surrounded by beautiful misty mountains, we fed the elephants, cleaned up after them, trekked with them through the surrounding jungle and gave them a good scrub in the black mud spa. Contributing to the functioning of the Thai Elephant Home was just as rewarding, working as a team to make fire breaks around the property and going out in to the fields to cut grass and corn to feed the elephants. The work didn’t seem so hard when almost every day we got to go swimming with the elephants in the river, watching them splash around and being able to give them a good wash and you could see how much they loved it. The elephants were cared for and the people were so friendly you really did feel like you were part of their family. Spending so much time up close and personal with these magnificent creatures and being immersed in authentic Thai culture was truly amazing and I can’t recommend it highly enough!

(Source: deakin-environment)

Volunteering in Costa Rica as part of my studies!
My name is Kristal and I am studying Environmental Science (Wildlife and Conservation Biology) at Deakin University and I was lucky enough to volunteer with International Student Volunteers in Costa Rica as part of my Global Environmental Placement. I participated in the Proyecto Carey project within the Osa Peninsula. We went for hikes through the beautiful rainforest right at our doorsteps where we did bird watching, tree measurements on big trees (the forests giants, some were over 300 years old), and counted seed traps. Through this trip I got to see animals I would never see back home such as kinkajous, sloths, toucans and many species of monkeys! I would have to say I most enjoyed walking through the rainforest where every few metres you could smell something different like, brown sugar, wild flowers, and the smell of incense from the lang  lang tree! Osa Peninsula is full of life and holds around 2.5% of the world’s biodiversity but some of this biodiversity is currently under threat, I was lucky enough to help conduct research in this amazing place to help aid in its survival! My experience is one I will never ever forget, I made new lifelong friends and gained knowledge and skills that I will be able to use in the future! Pura Vida!!
Aperture
f/6.3
Shutter Speed
1/160th
ISO
100
Focal Length
22mm
Camera
Canon EOS REBEL T3i
Volunteering in Costa Rica as part of my studies!
My name is Kristal and I am studying Environmental Science (Wildlife and Conservation Biology) at Deakin University and I was lucky enough to volunteer with International Student Volunteers in Costa Rica as part of my Global Environmental Placement. I participated in the Proyecto Carey project within the Osa Peninsula. We went for hikes through the beautiful rainforest right at our doorsteps where we did bird watching, tree measurements on big trees (the forests giants, some were over 300 years old), and counted seed traps. Through this trip I got to see animals I would never see back home such as kinkajous, sloths, toucans and many species of monkeys! I would have to say I most enjoyed walking through the rainforest where every few metres you could smell something different like, brown sugar, wild flowers, and the smell of incense from the lang  lang tree! Osa Peninsula is full of life and holds around 2.5% of the world’s biodiversity but some of this biodiversity is currently under threat, I was lucky enough to help conduct research in this amazing place to help aid in its survival! My experience is one I will never ever forget, I made new lifelong friends and gained knowledge and skills that I will be able to use in the future! Pura Vida!!
Volunteering in Costa Rica as part of my studies!
My name is Kristal and I am studying Environmental Science (Wildlife and Conservation Biology) at Deakin University and I was lucky enough to volunteer with International Student Volunteers in Costa Rica as part of my Global Environmental Placement. I participated in the Proyecto Carey project within the Osa Peninsula. We went for hikes through the beautiful rainforest right at our doorsteps where we did bird watching, tree measurements on big trees (the forests giants, some were over 300 years old), and counted seed traps. Through this trip I got to see animals I would never see back home such as kinkajous, sloths, toucans and many species of monkeys! I would have to say I most enjoyed walking through the rainforest where every few metres you could smell something different like, brown sugar, wild flowers, and the smell of incense from the lang  lang tree! Osa Peninsula is full of life and holds around 2.5% of the world’s biodiversity but some of this biodiversity is currently under threat, I was lucky enough to help conduct research in this amazing place to help aid in its survival! My experience is one I will never ever forget, I made new lifelong friends and gained knowledge and skills that I will be able to use in the future! Pura Vida!!
Aperture
f/6
Shutter Speed
1/60th
ISO
400
Focal Length
73mm
Camera
Panasonic DMC-TZ40

Volunteering in Costa Rica as part of my studies!

My name is Kristal and I am studying Environmental Science (Wildlife and Conservation Biology) at Deakin University and I was lucky enough to volunteer with International Student Volunteers in Costa Rica as part of my Global Environmental Placement. I participated in the Proyecto Carey project within the Osa Peninsula. We went for hikes through the beautiful rainforest right at our doorsteps where we did bird watching, tree measurements on big trees (the forests giants, some were over 300 years old), and counted seed traps. Through this trip I got to see animals I would never see back home such as kinkajous, sloths, toucans and many species of monkeys! I would have to say I most enjoyed walking through the rainforest where every few metres you could smell something different like, brown sugar, wild flowers, and the smell of incense from the lang  lang tree! Osa Peninsula is full of life and holds around 2.5% of the world’s biodiversity but some of this biodiversity is currently under threat, I was lucky enough to help conduct research in this amazing place to help aid in its survival! My experience is one I will never ever forget, I made new lifelong friends and gained knowledge and skills that I will be able to use in the future! Pura Vida!!

(Source: deakin-environment)


Pin-tailed Whydah first submission for best wildlife photo ever
While in Kenya on a tropical biology course with the ‘Tropical Biology Association’ of which Deakin is a member, Daniel Lees (PhD student of Dr Mike Weston) photographed this Pin-tailed Whydah (Vidua macroura) resting on a perch in between courtship displays. To display the males hover while singing and showcasing their exceptionally long tail feathers.
The opportunities for Global engagement at Deakin in Environmental Science are amazing. Imagine what you could do!

Pin-tailed Whydah first submission for best wildlife photo ever

While in Kenya on a tropical biology course with the ‘Tropical Biology Association’ of which Deakin is a member, Daniel Lees (PhD student of Dr Mike Weston) photographed this Pin-tailed Whydah (Vidua macroura) resting on a perch in between courtship displays. To display the males hover while singing and showcasing their exceptionally long tail feathers.

The opportunities for Global engagement at Deakin in Environmental Science are amazing. Imagine what you could do!

(Source: deakin-environment)

Professional Practice Encounter with a Cheetah
During my undergrad degree at Deakin I was lucky enough to complete my Professional Practice (SLE301) placement in South Africa. We radio tracked Cheetahs, monitored southern Ground Hornbill nests, observed the feeding hierarchy of hyenas and the movements of elephants throughout the park. During our surveys we stumbled upon a fresh leopard kill wedged in a tree and there, just below it was this beautiful lady leopard attempting to keep a hyena away! Best. Day. Ever :) 

Professional Practice Encounter with a Cheetah

During my undergrad degree at Deakin I was lucky enough to complete my Professional Practice (SLE301) placement in South Africa. We radio tracked Cheetahs, monitored southern Ground Hornbill nests, observed the feeding hierarchy of hyenas and the movements of elephants throughout the park. During our surveys we stumbled upon a fresh leopard kill wedged in a tree and there, just below it was this beautiful lady leopard attempting to keep a hyena away! Best. Day. Ever :) 

(Source: deakin-environment)

Global Environmental Placement in South Africa
Imagine the picturesque landscape of the open grasslands of Africa, its late evening and the temperature is pleasantly warm with a light breeze, the dry grass is golden as the sun sets over the nearby mountains and the clouds are vibrant colours of yellow, red, orange, even purple…you watch the most spectacular sunset you’ve ever seen while the landscape is thriving with life. My name is Matt and I was able to experience this at Phinda Game Reserve in South Africa, the jewel in the crown of Africa’s reserves as my Global Environmental Placement in the Bachelor of Environmental Science (Wildlife and Conservation Biology).

As an active conservation volunteer I was able to participate in the monitoring and management of some of Africa’s most iconic and endangered species, especially Rhino as the reserve has the largest private population in South Africa. Through daily ‘game drives’ I helped record data on these animals to help towards the research into population dynamics and ecology so these amazing animals can be better protected through future conservation management plans. I was also privileged to assist in the life changing and exhilarating hands on relocations of Lion, Cheetah and Rhino while surrounded by incredibly passionate and intelligent people whom gave me invaluable knowledge and insight.
Phinda, truly an unforgettable experience.
Aperture
f/2.8
Shutter Speed
1/250th
ISO
100
Focal Length
4mm
Camera
Panasonic DMC-FZ28
Global Environmental Placement in South Africa
Imagine the picturesque landscape of the open grasslands of Africa, its late evening and the temperature is pleasantly warm with a light breeze, the dry grass is golden as the sun sets over the nearby mountains and the clouds are vibrant colours of yellow, red, orange, even purple…you watch the most spectacular sunset you’ve ever seen while the landscape is thriving with life. My name is Matt and I was able to experience this at Phinda Game Reserve in South Africa, the jewel in the crown of Africa’s reserves as my Global Environmental Placement in the Bachelor of Environmental Science (Wildlife and Conservation Biology).

As an active conservation volunteer I was able to participate in the monitoring and management of some of Africa’s most iconic and endangered species, especially Rhino as the reserve has the largest private population in South Africa. Through daily ‘game drives’ I helped record data on these animals to help towards the research into population dynamics and ecology so these amazing animals can be better protected through future conservation management plans. I was also privileged to assist in the life changing and exhilarating hands on relocations of Lion, Cheetah and Rhino while surrounded by incredibly passionate and intelligent people whom gave me invaluable knowledge and insight.
Phinda, truly an unforgettable experience.
Aperture
f/5
Shutter Speed
1/320th
ISO
100
Focal Length
4mm
Camera
Panasonic DMC-FZ28
Global Environmental Placement in South Africa
Imagine the picturesque landscape of the open grasslands of Africa, its late evening and the temperature is pleasantly warm with a light breeze, the dry grass is golden as the sun sets over the nearby mountains and the clouds are vibrant colours of yellow, red, orange, even purple…you watch the most spectacular sunset you’ve ever seen while the landscape is thriving with life. My name is Matt and I was able to experience this at Phinda Game Reserve in South Africa, the jewel in the crown of Africa’s reserves as my Global Environmental Placement in the Bachelor of Environmental Science (Wildlife and Conservation Biology).

As an active conservation volunteer I was able to participate in the monitoring and management of some of Africa’s most iconic and endangered species, especially Rhino as the reserve has the largest private population in South Africa. Through daily ‘game drives’ I helped record data on these animals to help towards the research into population dynamics and ecology so these amazing animals can be better protected through future conservation management plans. I was also privileged to assist in the life changing and exhilarating hands on relocations of Lion, Cheetah and Rhino while surrounded by incredibly passionate and intelligent people whom gave me invaluable knowledge and insight.
Phinda, truly an unforgettable experience.
Aperture
f/4
Shutter Speed
1/160th
ISO
160
Focal Length
10mm
Camera
Panasonic DMC-FZ28

Global Environmental Placement in South Africa

Imagine the picturesque landscape of the open grasslands of Africa, its late evening and the temperature is pleasantly warm with a light breeze, the dry grass is golden as the sun sets over the nearby mountains and the clouds are vibrant colours of yellow, red, orange, even purple…you watch the most spectacular sunset you’ve ever seen while the landscape is thriving with life. My name is Matt and I was able to experience this at Phinda Game Reserve in South Africa, the jewel in the crown of Africa’s reserves as my Global Environmental Placement in the Bachelor of Environmental Science (Wildlife and Conservation Biology).

As an active conservation volunteer I was able to participate in the monitoring and management of some of Africa’s most iconic and endangered species, especially Rhino as the reserve has the largest private population in South Africa. Through daily ‘game drives’ I helped record data on these animals to help towards the research into population dynamics and ecology so these amazing animals can be better protected through future conservation management plans. I was also privileged to assist in the life changing and exhilarating hands on relocations of Lion, Cheetah and Rhino while surrounded by incredibly passionate and intelligent people whom gave me invaluable knowledge and insight.

Phinda, truly an unforgettable experience.

(Source: deakin-environment)

A few Bird shots from Taiwan
In 2011, we took our international environmental science study tour (SLE353) to Taiwan. It was an amazing place, and the support, knowledge and care provided by Professor Wang and his students from National Taiwan Normal University was stellar.
The above birds are a grey-chinned minivet (Top), Muller’s Barbet, known locally as the 5 colour bird (I wonder why?), and finally a pair of grey-tailed tattler’s (bottom). I think we were all amazed by the amazing natural environments and wildlife that Taiwan had to offer, especially given the human population is similar to Australia’s yet the land mass is tiny. 
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/100th
ISO
800
Focal Length
471mm
Camera
Canon EOS 40D
A few Bird shots from Taiwan
In 2011, we took our international environmental science study tour (SLE353) to Taiwan. It was an amazing place, and the support, knowledge and care provided by Professor Wang and his students from National Taiwan Normal University was stellar.
The above birds are a grey-chinned minivet (Top), Muller’s Barbet, known locally as the 5 colour bird (I wonder why?), and finally a pair of grey-tailed tattler’s (bottom). I think we were all amazed by the amazing natural environments and wildlife that Taiwan had to offer, especially given the human population is similar to Australia’s yet the land mass is tiny. 
Aperture
f/5.6
Shutter Speed
1/100th
ISO
800
Focal Length
471mm
Camera
Canon EOS 40D
A few Bird shots from Taiwan
In 2011, we took our international environmental science study tour (SLE353) to Taiwan. It was an amazing place, and the support, knowledge and care provided by Professor Wang and his students from National Taiwan Normal University was stellar.
The above birds are a grey-chinned minivet (Top), Muller’s Barbet, known locally as the 5 colour bird (I wonder why?), and finally a pair of grey-tailed tattler’s (bottom). I think we were all amazed by the amazing natural environments and wildlife that Taiwan had to offer, especially given the human population is similar to Australia’s yet the land mass is tiny. 
Aperture
f/8
Shutter Speed
1/500th
ISO
250
Focal Length
471mm
Camera
Canon EOS 40D

A few Bird shots from Taiwan

In 2011, we took our international environmental science study tour (SLE353) to Taiwan. It was an amazing place, and the support, knowledge and care provided by Professor Wang and his students from National Taiwan Normal University was stellar.

The above birds are a grey-chinned minivet (Top), Muller’s Barbet, known locally as the 5 colour bird (I wonder why?), and finally a pair of grey-tailed tattler’s (bottom). I think we were all amazed by the amazing natural environments and wildlife that Taiwan had to offer, especially given the human population is similar to Australia’s yet the land mass is tiny. 

(Source: deakin-environment)

Taking in the wonders of Peru!
This great story and wonderful images are provided by Rohan, A Bachelor of Environmental Science (Environmental Management and Sustainability) at Deakin University, Australia. The Peruvian Biodiversity unit is running again in January 2015, does this sound like you? 
I completed a one month intensive unit in Biodiversity of Peru, at the Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola, Cusco in January, 2014. As you probably expect, South America has more biodiversity than any other continent, which makes Peru a perfect country to study this subject. The study was highlighted by the many field trips and tours, notably to the Amazon Rainforest. This is a place I have always dreamed of visiting, and now having been there I have a deeper understanding of the role this icon plays in the lives of Peruvians and the Earth’s biodiversity. During your time in this magical and unique part of the world you will encounter typical Amazonian fauna such as monkeys, macaws, toucans, caiman and tarantulas – and if you’re lucky (depending on your fondness for exotic animals) – anacondas and piranhas. Meanwhile, back at our home base in Cusco which is situated at high altitude (3,400m a.s.l.) in the Andean mountains, we were surrounded by Incan and modern Peruvian cultures, food, music and language - including their delicacy dish – roasted Guinea Pig, and frequent sightings of Llamas and Alpacas, while pan flutes and charangos (Peruvian guitars) play in the streets.
Of course a trip to Peru is not complete without a Visit to one the new Seven Wonders of the World - Machu Picchu. Situated about 1,000 m lower in altitude than Cusco, Machu Picchu is surrounded by sub-tropical vegetation and landscapes, which drives home just how much diversity there is in the region of South America. The tour gave cultural context to the history of the Incan civilization, as well as reinforcing the knowledge of their ecological resources and surroundings.
This study tour introduced me to a whole new culture, experience and perspective, as well as enabling me to fulfill lifelong ambitions of visiting the most biodiverse region on the planet. Peru, and South America in general, is hugely diverse, and although we were exposed to a bit of everything it had to offer, there is so much more to see and do which has given me the urge to go back.    
Thinking about studying abroad? My advice to you!
Definitely do it. Studying abroad has been the highlight of my degree so far and opens your eyes to all sorts of new and different experiences. Take advantage of the loan schemes while you can, travelling becomes very inexpensive when you have the Government provide loans for most of it. My advice for if you do study overseas is to immerse yourself in the culture and language of wherever you are going, and just try as many new things and push your comfort zone as much as possible.
Some of the invertebrates we encountered on our trips to Machu Pichhu and the Amazon.
Taking in the wonders of Peru!
This great story and wonderful images are provided by Rohan, A Bachelor of Environmental Science (Environmental Management and Sustainability) at Deakin University, Australia. The Peruvian Biodiversity unit is running again in January 2015, does this sound like you? 
I completed a one month intensive unit in Biodiversity of Peru, at the Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola, Cusco in January, 2014. As you probably expect, South America has more biodiversity than any other continent, which makes Peru a perfect country to study this subject. The study was highlighted by the many field trips and tours, notably to the Amazon Rainforest. This is a place I have always dreamed of visiting, and now having been there I have a deeper understanding of the role this icon plays in the lives of Peruvians and the Earth’s biodiversity. During your time in this magical and unique part of the world you will encounter typical Amazonian fauna such as monkeys, macaws, toucans, caiman and tarantulas – and if you’re lucky (depending on your fondness for exotic animals) – anacondas and piranhas. Meanwhile, back at our home base in Cusco which is situated at high altitude (3,400m a.s.l.) in the Andean mountains, we were surrounded by Incan and modern Peruvian cultures, food, music and language - including their delicacy dish – roasted Guinea Pig, and frequent sightings of Llamas and Alpacas, while pan flutes and charangos (Peruvian guitars) play in the streets.
Of course a trip to Peru is not complete without a Visit to one the new Seven Wonders of the World - Machu Picchu. Situated about 1,000 m lower in altitude than Cusco, Machu Picchu is surrounded by sub-tropical vegetation and landscapes, which drives home just how much diversity there is in the region of South America. The tour gave cultural context to the history of the Incan civilization, as well as reinforcing the knowledge of their ecological resources and surroundings.
This study tour introduced me to a whole new culture, experience and perspective, as well as enabling me to fulfill lifelong ambitions of visiting the most biodiverse region on the planet. Peru, and South America in general, is hugely diverse, and although we were exposed to a bit of everything it had to offer, there is so much more to see and do which has given me the urge to go back.    
Thinking about studying abroad? My advice to you!
Definitely do it. Studying abroad has been the highlight of my degree so far and opens your eyes to all sorts of new and different experiences. Take advantage of the loan schemes while you can, travelling becomes very inexpensive when you have the Government provide loans for most of it. My advice for if you do study overseas is to immerse yourself in the culture and language of wherever you are going, and just try as many new things and push your comfort zone as much as possible.
Half our study group with a large Elephant Tree after a days walk through the jungles of the Amazon Rainforest.
Taking in the wonders of Peru!
This great story and wonderful images are provided by Rohan, A Bachelor of Environmental Science (Environmental Management and Sustainability) at Deakin University, Australia. The Peruvian Biodiversity unit is running again in January 2015, does this sound like you? 
I completed a one month intensive unit in Biodiversity of Peru, at the Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola, Cusco in January, 2014. As you probably expect, South America has more biodiversity than any other continent, which makes Peru a perfect country to study this subject. The study was highlighted by the many field trips and tours, notably to the Amazon Rainforest. This is a place I have always dreamed of visiting, and now having been there I have a deeper understanding of the role this icon plays in the lives of Peruvians and the Earth’s biodiversity. During your time in this magical and unique part of the world you will encounter typical Amazonian fauna such as monkeys, macaws, toucans, caiman and tarantulas – and if you’re lucky (depending on your fondness for exotic animals) – anacondas and piranhas. Meanwhile, back at our home base in Cusco which is situated at high altitude (3,400m a.s.l.) in the Andean mountains, we were surrounded by Incan and modern Peruvian cultures, food, music and language - including their delicacy dish – roasted Guinea Pig, and frequent sightings of Llamas and Alpacas, while pan flutes and charangos (Peruvian guitars) play in the streets.
Of course a trip to Peru is not complete without a Visit to one the new Seven Wonders of the World - Machu Picchu. Situated about 1,000 m lower in altitude than Cusco, Machu Picchu is surrounded by sub-tropical vegetation and landscapes, which drives home just how much diversity there is in the region of South America. The tour gave cultural context to the history of the Incan civilization, as well as reinforcing the knowledge of their ecological resources and surroundings.
This study tour introduced me to a whole new culture, experience and perspective, as well as enabling me to fulfill lifelong ambitions of visiting the most biodiverse region on the planet. Peru, and South America in general, is hugely diverse, and although we were exposed to a bit of everything it had to offer, there is so much more to see and do which has given me the urge to go back.    
Thinking about studying abroad? My advice to you!
Definitely do it. Studying abroad has been the highlight of my degree so far and opens your eyes to all sorts of new and different experiences. Take advantage of the loan schemes while you can, travelling becomes very inexpensive when you have the Government provide loans for most of it. My advice for if you do study overseas is to immerse yourself in the culture and language of wherever you are going, and just try as many new things and push your comfort zone as much as possible.
Myself standing at Machu Picchu after a steep hike from the town of Agua Calientes.
Taking in the wonders of Peru!
This great story and wonderful images are provided by Rohan, A Bachelor of Environmental Science (Environmental Management and Sustainability) at Deakin University, Australia. The Peruvian Biodiversity unit is running again in January 2015, does this sound like you? 
I completed a one month intensive unit in Biodiversity of Peru, at the Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola, Cusco in January, 2014. As you probably expect, South America has more biodiversity than any other continent, which makes Peru a perfect country to study this subject. The study was highlighted by the many field trips and tours, notably to the Amazon Rainforest. This is a place I have always dreamed of visiting, and now having been there I have a deeper understanding of the role this icon plays in the lives of Peruvians and the Earth’s biodiversity. During your time in this magical and unique part of the world you will encounter typical Amazonian fauna such as monkeys, macaws, toucans, caiman and tarantulas – and if you’re lucky (depending on your fondness for exotic animals) – anacondas and piranhas. Meanwhile, back at our home base in Cusco which is situated at high altitude (3,400m a.s.l.) in the Andean mountains, we were surrounded by Incan and modern Peruvian cultures, food, music and language - including their delicacy dish – roasted Guinea Pig, and frequent sightings of Llamas and Alpacas, while pan flutes and charangos (Peruvian guitars) play in the streets.
Of course a trip to Peru is not complete without a Visit to one the new Seven Wonders of the World - Machu Picchu. Situated about 1,000 m lower in altitude than Cusco, Machu Picchu is surrounded by sub-tropical vegetation and landscapes, which drives home just how much diversity there is in the region of South America. The tour gave cultural context to the history of the Incan civilization, as well as reinforcing the knowledge of their ecological resources and surroundings.
This study tour introduced me to a whole new culture, experience and perspective, as well as enabling me to fulfill lifelong ambitions of visiting the most biodiverse region on the planet. Peru, and South America in general, is hugely diverse, and although we were exposed to a bit of everything it had to offer, there is so much more to see and do which has given me the urge to go back.    
Thinking about studying abroad? My advice to you!
Definitely do it. Studying abroad has been the highlight of my degree so far and opens your eyes to all sorts of new and different experiences. Take advantage of the loan schemes while you can, travelling becomes very inexpensive when you have the Government provide loans for most of it. My advice for if you do study overseas is to immerse yourself in the culture and language of wherever you are going, and just try as many new things and push your comfort zone as much as possible.
A Black Caiman being fed some meat.
Taking in the wonders of Peru!
This great story and wonderful images are provided by Rohan, A Bachelor of Environmental Science (Environmental Management and Sustainability) at Deakin University, Australia. The Peruvian Biodiversity unit is running again in January 2015, does this sound like you? 
I completed a one month intensive unit in Biodiversity of Peru, at the Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola, Cusco in January, 2014. As you probably expect, South America has more biodiversity than any other continent, which makes Peru a perfect country to study this subject. The study was highlighted by the many field trips and tours, notably to the Amazon Rainforest. This is a place I have always dreamed of visiting, and now having been there I have a deeper understanding of the role this icon plays in the lives of Peruvians and the Earth’s biodiversity. During your time in this magical and unique part of the world you will encounter typical Amazonian fauna such as monkeys, macaws, toucans, caiman and tarantulas – and if you’re lucky (depending on your fondness for exotic animals) – anacondas and piranhas. Meanwhile, back at our home base in Cusco which is situated at high altitude (3,400m a.s.l.) in the Andean mountains, we were surrounded by Incan and modern Peruvian cultures, food, music and language - including their delicacy dish – roasted Guinea Pig, and frequent sightings of Llamas and Alpacas, while pan flutes and charangos (Peruvian guitars) play in the streets.
Of course a trip to Peru is not complete without a Visit to one the new Seven Wonders of the World - Machu Picchu. Situated about 1,000 m lower in altitude than Cusco, Machu Picchu is surrounded by sub-tropical vegetation and landscapes, which drives home just how much diversity there is in the region of South America. The tour gave cultural context to the history of the Incan civilization, as well as reinforcing the knowledge of their ecological resources and surroundings.
This study tour introduced me to a whole new culture, experience and perspective, as well as enabling me to fulfill lifelong ambitions of visiting the most biodiverse region on the planet. Peru, and South America in general, is hugely diverse, and although we were exposed to a bit of everything it had to offer, there is so much more to see and do which has given me the urge to go back.    
Thinking about studying abroad? My advice to you!
Definitely do it. Studying abroad has been the highlight of my degree so far and opens your eyes to all sorts of new and different experiences. Take advantage of the loan schemes while you can, travelling becomes very inexpensive when you have the Government provide loans for most of it. My advice for if you do study overseas is to immerse yourself in the culture and language of wherever you are going, and just try as many new things and push your comfort zone as much as possible.
A Squirrel Monkey seen on our boat ride along the Rio Madre de Dios (Mother of God River) on the edge of the Tambopata National Park section of the Amazon Rainforest.
Taking in the wonders of Peru!
This great story and wonderful images are provided by Rohan, A Bachelor of Environmental Science (Environmental Management and Sustainability) at Deakin University, Australia. The Peruvian Biodiversity unit is running again in January 2015, does this sound like you? 
I completed a one month intensive unit in Biodiversity of Peru, at the Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola, Cusco in January, 2014. As you probably expect, South America has more biodiversity than any other continent, which makes Peru a perfect country to study this subject. The study was highlighted by the many field trips and tours, notably to the Amazon Rainforest. This is a place I have always dreamed of visiting, and now having been there I have a deeper understanding of the role this icon plays in the lives of Peruvians and the Earth’s biodiversity. During your time in this magical and unique part of the world you will encounter typical Amazonian fauna such as monkeys, macaws, toucans, caiman and tarantulas – and if you’re lucky (depending on your fondness for exotic animals) – anacondas and piranhas. Meanwhile, back at our home base in Cusco which is situated at high altitude (3,400m a.s.l.) in the Andean mountains, we were surrounded by Incan and modern Peruvian cultures, food, music and language - including their delicacy dish – roasted Guinea Pig, and frequent sightings of Llamas and Alpacas, while pan flutes and charangos (Peruvian guitars) play in the streets.
Of course a trip to Peru is not complete without a Visit to one the new Seven Wonders of the World - Machu Picchu. Situated about 1,000 m lower in altitude than Cusco, Machu Picchu is surrounded by sub-tropical vegetation and landscapes, which drives home just how much diversity there is in the region of South America. The tour gave cultural context to the history of the Incan civilization, as well as reinforcing the knowledge of their ecological resources and surroundings.
This study tour introduced me to a whole new culture, experience and perspective, as well as enabling me to fulfill lifelong ambitions of visiting the most biodiverse region on the planet. Peru, and South America in general, is hugely diverse, and although we were exposed to a bit of everything it had to offer, there is so much more to see and do which has given me the urge to go back.    
Thinking about studying abroad? My advice to you!
Definitely do it. Studying abroad has been the highlight of my degree so far and opens your eyes to all sorts of new and different experiences. Take advantage of the loan schemes while you can, travelling becomes very inexpensive when you have the Government provide loans for most of it. My advice for if you do study overseas is to immerse yourself in the culture and language of wherever you are going, and just try as many new things and push your comfort zone as much as possible.
A Spiny Whorltail Iguana (Stenocercus crassicaudatus), a common lizard at Machu Picchu.
Taking in the wonders of Peru!
This great story and wonderful images are provided by Rohan, A Bachelor of Environmental Science (Environmental Management and Sustainability) at Deakin University, Australia. The Peruvian Biodiversity unit is running again in January 2015, does this sound like you? 
I completed a one month intensive unit in Biodiversity of Peru, at the Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola, Cusco in January, 2014. As you probably expect, South America has more biodiversity than any other continent, which makes Peru a perfect country to study this subject. The study was highlighted by the many field trips and tours, notably to the Amazon Rainforest. This is a place I have always dreamed of visiting, and now having been there I have a deeper understanding of the role this icon plays in the lives of Peruvians and the Earth’s biodiversity. During your time in this magical and unique part of the world you will encounter typical Amazonian fauna such as monkeys, macaws, toucans, caiman and tarantulas – and if you’re lucky (depending on your fondness for exotic animals) – anacondas and piranhas. Meanwhile, back at our home base in Cusco which is situated at high altitude (3,400m a.s.l.) in the Andean mountains, we were surrounded by Incan and modern Peruvian cultures, food, music and language - including their delicacy dish – roasted Guinea Pig, and frequent sightings of Llamas and Alpacas, while pan flutes and charangos (Peruvian guitars) play in the streets.
Of course a trip to Peru is not complete without a Visit to one the new Seven Wonders of the World - Machu Picchu. Situated about 1,000 m lower in altitude than Cusco, Machu Picchu is surrounded by sub-tropical vegetation and landscapes, which drives home just how much diversity there is in the region of South America. The tour gave cultural context to the history of the Incan civilization, as well as reinforcing the knowledge of their ecological resources and surroundings.
This study tour introduced me to a whole new culture, experience and perspective, as well as enabling me to fulfill lifelong ambitions of visiting the most biodiverse region on the planet. Peru, and South America in general, is hugely diverse, and although we were exposed to a bit of everything it had to offer, there is so much more to see and do which has given me the urge to go back.    
Thinking about studying abroad? My advice to you!
Definitely do it. Studying abroad has been the highlight of my degree so far and opens your eyes to all sorts of new and different experiences. Take advantage of the loan schemes while you can, travelling becomes very inexpensive when you have the Government provide loans for most of it. My advice for if you do study overseas is to immerse yourself in the culture and language of wherever you are going, and just try as many new things and push your comfort zone as much as possible.
A relative of the opossum, we found this guy while looking for Anacondas.
Taking in the wonders of Peru!
This great story and wonderful images are provided by Rohan, A Bachelor of Environmental Science (Environmental Management and Sustainability) at Deakin University, Australia. The Peruvian Biodiversity unit is running again in January 2015, does this sound like you? 
I completed a one month intensive unit in Biodiversity of Peru, at the Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola, Cusco in January, 2014. As you probably expect, South America has more biodiversity than any other continent, which makes Peru a perfect country to study this subject. The study was highlighted by the many field trips and tours, notably to the Amazon Rainforest. This is a place I have always dreamed of visiting, and now having been there I have a deeper understanding of the role this icon plays in the lives of Peruvians and the Earth’s biodiversity. During your time in this magical and unique part of the world you will encounter typical Amazonian fauna such as monkeys, macaws, toucans, caiman and tarantulas – and if you’re lucky (depending on your fondness for exotic animals) – anacondas and piranhas. Meanwhile, back at our home base in Cusco which is situated at high altitude (3,400m a.s.l.) in the Andean mountains, we were surrounded by Incan and modern Peruvian cultures, food, music and language - including their delicacy dish – roasted Guinea Pig, and frequent sightings of Llamas and Alpacas, while pan flutes and charangos (Peruvian guitars) play in the streets.
Of course a trip to Peru is not complete without a Visit to one the new Seven Wonders of the World - Machu Picchu. Situated about 1,000 m lower in altitude than Cusco, Machu Picchu is surrounded by sub-tropical vegetation and landscapes, which drives home just how much diversity there is in the region of South America. The tour gave cultural context to the history of the Incan civilization, as well as reinforcing the knowledge of their ecological resources and surroundings.
This study tour introduced me to a whole new culture, experience and perspective, as well as enabling me to fulfill lifelong ambitions of visiting the most biodiverse region on the planet. Peru, and South America in general, is hugely diverse, and although we were exposed to a bit of everything it had to offer, there is so much more to see and do which has given me the urge to go back.    
Thinking about studying abroad? My advice to you!
Definitely do it. Studying abroad has been the highlight of my degree so far and opens your eyes to all sorts of new and different experiences. Take advantage of the loan schemes while you can, travelling becomes very inexpensive when you have the Government provide loans for most of it. My advice for if you do study overseas is to immerse yourself in the culture and language of wherever you are going, and just try as many new things and push your comfort zone as much as possible.
A collection of some of the Llamas and Alpacas (and an Andean Eagle) seen throughout the study.

Taking in the wonders of Peru!

This great story and wonderful images are provided by Rohan, A Bachelor of Environmental Science (Environmental Management and Sustainability) at Deakin University, Australia. The Peruvian Biodiversity unit is running again in January 2015, does this sound like you?

I completed a one month intensive unit in Biodiversity of Peru, at the Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola, Cusco in January, 2014. As you probably expect, South America has more biodiversity than any other continent, which makes Peru a perfect country to study this subject. The study was highlighted by the many field trips and tours, notably to the Amazon Rainforest. This is a place I have always dreamed of visiting, and now having been there I have a deeper understanding of the role this icon plays in the lives of Peruvians and the Earth’s biodiversity. During your time in this magical and unique part of the world you will encounter typical Amazonian fauna such as monkeys, macaws, toucans, caiman and tarantulas – and if you’re lucky (depending on your fondness for exotic animals) – anacondas and piranhas. Meanwhile, back at our home base in Cusco which is situated at high altitude (3,400m a.s.l.) in the Andean mountains, we were surrounded by Incan and modern Peruvian cultures, food, music and language - including their delicacy dish – roasted Guinea Pig, and frequent sightings of Llamas and Alpacas, while pan flutes and charangos (Peruvian guitars) play in the streets.

Of course a trip to Peru is not complete without a Visit to one the new Seven Wonders of the World - Machu Picchu. Situated about 1,000 m lower in altitude than Cusco, Machu Picchu is surrounded by sub-tropical vegetation and landscapes, which drives home just how much diversity there is in the region of South America. The tour gave cultural context to the history of the Incan civilization, as well as reinforcing the knowledge of their ecological resources and surroundings.

This study tour introduced me to a whole new culture, experience and perspective, as well as enabling me to fulfill lifelong ambitions of visiting the most biodiverse region on the planet. Peru, and South America in general, is hugely diverse, and although we were exposed to a bit of everything it had to offer, there is so much more to see and do which has given me the urge to go back.   

Thinking about studying abroad? My advice to you!

Definitely do it. Studying abroad has been the highlight of my degree so far and opens your eyes to all sorts of new and different experiences. Take advantage of the loan schemes while you can, travelling becomes very inexpensive when you have the Government provide loans for most of it. My advice for if you do study overseas is to immerse yourself in the culture and language of wherever you are going, and just try as many new things and push your comfort zone as much as possible.

(Source: deakin-environment)

My Swedish Architecture Adventure

Here is another great story from one of our students who is currently OS studying architecture and construction management. James has just finished a semester at Jonkoping University in Sweden and will soon be heading to Roger Williams University in Rhode Island, USA, for semester 2.  It really is great to hear the experiences of our students. We hope James may help inspire you to get out your passport and take your study to the World!

I am a 21 year old Architecture/ Construction Management student from the Waterfront Campus. I’ve studied at Deakin ever since I left school, and when the opportunity to study on exchange came up, a little piece of me couldn’t let go of the idea. So acting purely on courage and blind faith, I got myself to Sweden, with no real understanding of what would happen, as not only had I never travelled overseas before, but neither had my parents. All I knew was that if you started in Melbourne and drilled a hole through the centre of the earth, you would end up somewhere in Scandinavia. What started with gastro on the first night from a hostel in Gothenburg became a roller-coaster of unforgettable experiences and beautiful moments that I will cherish for the rest of my life.  I lived in a small room, and shared a kitchen, bathroom and common room with 12 other people on my floor, an incredibly humbling experience.  Almost instantly, they became like my second family, as we were from all corners of the world, far from home and living in a country where a foreign language was spoken! I should point out that Sweden is one of the best countries in Europe at speaking English as a second language (some Swedes were more fluent than some of my mates back home!) and all the international subjects were delivered in English. The majority of my housemates were bilingual, which made me jealous, but also left me in awe at their resilience to cope in a foreign place. Note to self- learn more than one language, you idiot.

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My Maldives Adventure
Another one of our Global Environmental Placement students (SLE225) reports back after their amazing international experience. We absolutely love this photo of Megan with a manta ray - how cool is this!!  - the Deakin enviro team
My name is Megan and I am studying Bachelor of Environmental Science (Marine Biology) at Deakin University in Warrnambool. For my Global Environmental Placement I went to the Maldives for four weeks to do a marine conservation program with Atoll Volunteers. I loved every moment of my placement but especially enjoyed snorkelling in the crystal clear ocean every day as part of my ‘job’ and assisting in the rehabilitation and care of gorgeous green sea turtles on a daily basis. I value each experience I had during my time living in the Maldives and particularly will treasure how it really confirmed where I would like my marine biology career to lead. Doing marine conservation work for a month gave me a taste of what it would be like and how it would make me feel. Doing something that was making a difference and helping a species that was endangered made me incredibly happy and really lit up the path for my future. It confirmed that I want to do conservation work as a profession and make a difference whether it is for just one small species or for something even greater.
Aperture
f/3.5
Shutter Speed
1/320th
ISO
100
Focal Length
6mm
Camera
Olympus TG-2
My Maldives Adventure
Another one of our Global Environmental Placement students (SLE225) reports back after their amazing international experience. We absolutely love this photo of Megan with a manta ray - how cool is this!!  - the Deakin enviro team
My name is Megan and I am studying Bachelor of Environmental Science (Marine Biology) at Deakin University in Warrnambool. For my Global Environmental Placement I went to the Maldives for four weeks to do a marine conservation program with Atoll Volunteers. I loved every moment of my placement but especially enjoyed snorkelling in the crystal clear ocean every day as part of my ‘job’ and assisting in the rehabilitation and care of gorgeous green sea turtles on a daily basis. I value each experience I had during my time living in the Maldives and particularly will treasure how it really confirmed where I would like my marine biology career to lead. Doing marine conservation work for a month gave me a taste of what it would be like and how it would make me feel. Doing something that was making a difference and helping a species that was endangered made me incredibly happy and really lit up the path for my future. It confirmed that I want to do conservation work as a profession and make a difference whether it is for just one small species or for something even greater.
My Maldives Adventure
Another one of our Global Environmental Placement students (SLE225) reports back after their amazing international experience. We absolutely love this photo of Megan with a manta ray - how cool is this!!  - the Deakin enviro team
My name is Megan and I am studying Bachelor of Environmental Science (Marine Biology) at Deakin University in Warrnambool. For my Global Environmental Placement I went to the Maldives for four weeks to do a marine conservation program with Atoll Volunteers. I loved every moment of my placement but especially enjoyed snorkelling in the crystal clear ocean every day as part of my ‘job’ and assisting in the rehabilitation and care of gorgeous green sea turtles on a daily basis. I value each experience I had during my time living in the Maldives and particularly will treasure how it really confirmed where I would like my marine biology career to lead. Doing marine conservation work for a month gave me a taste of what it would be like and how it would make me feel. Doing something that was making a difference and helping a species that was endangered made me incredibly happy and really lit up the path for my future. It confirmed that I want to do conservation work as a profession and make a difference whether it is for just one small species or for something even greater.
Aperture
f/2.8
Shutter Speed
1/313th
ISO
100
Focal Length
2mm
Camera
GoPro HERO3+ Black Edition
My Maldives Adventure
Another one of our Global Environmental Placement students (SLE225) reports back after their amazing international experience. We absolutely love this photo of Megan with a manta ray - how cool is this!!  - the Deakin enviro team
My name is Megan and I am studying Bachelor of Environmental Science (Marine Biology) at Deakin University in Warrnambool. For my Global Environmental Placement I went to the Maldives for four weeks to do a marine conservation program with Atoll Volunteers. I loved every moment of my placement but especially enjoyed snorkelling in the crystal clear ocean every day as part of my ‘job’ and assisting in the rehabilitation and care of gorgeous green sea turtles on a daily basis. I value each experience I had during my time living in the Maldives and particularly will treasure how it really confirmed where I would like my marine biology career to lead. Doing marine conservation work for a month gave me a taste of what it would be like and how it would make me feel. Doing something that was making a difference and helping a species that was endangered made me incredibly happy and really lit up the path for my future. It confirmed that I want to do conservation work as a profession and make a difference whether it is for just one small species or for something even greater.
My Maldives Adventure
Another one of our Global Environmental Placement students (SLE225) reports back after their amazing international experience. We absolutely love this photo of Megan with a manta ray - how cool is this!!  - the Deakin enviro team
My name is Megan and I am studying Bachelor of Environmental Science (Marine Biology) at Deakin University in Warrnambool. For my Global Environmental Placement I went to the Maldives for four weeks to do a marine conservation program with Atoll Volunteers. I loved every moment of my placement but especially enjoyed snorkelling in the crystal clear ocean every day as part of my ‘job’ and assisting in the rehabilitation and care of gorgeous green sea turtles on a daily basis. I value each experience I had during my time living in the Maldives and particularly will treasure how it really confirmed where I would like my marine biology career to lead. Doing marine conservation work for a month gave me a taste of what it would be like and how it would make me feel. Doing something that was making a difference and helping a species that was endangered made me incredibly happy and really lit up the path for my future. It confirmed that I want to do conservation work as a profession and make a difference whether it is for just one small species or for something even greater.
My Maldives Adventure
Another one of our Global Environmental Placement students (SLE225) reports back after their amazing international experience. We absolutely love this photo of Megan with a manta ray - how cool is this!!  - the Deakin enviro team
My name is Megan and I am studying Bachelor of Environmental Science (Marine Biology) at Deakin University in Warrnambool. For my Global Environmental Placement I went to the Maldives for four weeks to do a marine conservation program with Atoll Volunteers. I loved every moment of my placement but especially enjoyed snorkelling in the crystal clear ocean every day as part of my ‘job’ and assisting in the rehabilitation and care of gorgeous green sea turtles on a daily basis. I value each experience I had during my time living in the Maldives and particularly will treasure how it really confirmed where I would like my marine biology career to lead. Doing marine conservation work for a month gave me a taste of what it would be like and how it would make me feel. Doing something that was making a difference and helping a species that was endangered made me incredibly happy and really lit up the path for my future. It confirmed that I want to do conservation work as a profession and make a difference whether it is for just one small species or for something even greater.
Aperture
f/2.8
Shutter Speed
1/177th
ISO
100
Focal Length
2mm
Camera
GoPro HERO3+ Black Edition

My Maldives Adventure

Another one of our Global Environmental Placement students (SLE225) reports back after their amazing international experience. We absolutely love this photo of Megan with a manta ray - how cool is this!!  - the Deakin enviro team

My name is Megan and I am studying Bachelor of Environmental Science (Marine Biology) at Deakin University in Warrnambool. For my Global Environmental Placement I went to the Maldives for four weeks to do a marine conservation program with Atoll Volunteers. I loved every moment of my placement but especially enjoyed snorkelling in the crystal clear ocean every day as part of my ‘job’ and assisting in the rehabilitation and care of gorgeous green sea turtles on a daily basis. I value each experience I had during my time living in the Maldives and particularly will treasure how it really confirmed where I would like my marine biology career to lead. Doing marine conservation work for a month gave me a taste of what it would be like and how it would make me feel. Doing something that was making a difference and helping a species that was endangered made me incredibly happy and really lit up the path for my future. It confirmed that I want to do conservation work as a profession and make a difference whether it is for just one small species or for something even greater.

(Source: deakin-environment)

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